Achieve Maximum Efficiency

Intel XML

Subscribe to Intel XML: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts newslettersWeekly Newsletters
Get Intel XML: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories

Back in 2001 (wow – seems like yesterday!), F5 introduced the first-ever, open/Web services API for network devices called iControl. With it, it sparked a major shift in the way companies could look at integrating network devices with applications. Leading software vendors figured it out. And, thousands of companies since then have used iControl to build custom monitoring apps, management solutions that more closely fit their internal processes, and even automate some cool stuff including enabling applications to tell the network how to deliver them. While all fine and dandy (and fun to be a part of personally), the most important decision and event was the willingness to embrace SOAP/XML. By doing this (kudos to Joe Pruitt, BTW, for this call… it wasn’t without some feisty internal debate, truth be told), it opened up API access to our gear from virtually any SOAP... (more)

Shrink-Url - Use PowerShell To Shrink Your Urls

Shrinking your Url’s is all the rage nowadays.  If you are on Twitter, then odds are you have used one.  Despite CodingHorror’s distaste for them in his recent blog post on Url Shorteners: Destroying the Web since 2002, they are a fact of life when we live in a world of 140 character status updates. So what’s a URL shrinking service anyway?  Well, to put it simply, you supply them with a URL, they then supply you with a shorter URL containing a lookup “key”.  When future requests are made to this shorter URL, connections are routed to that services website where they convert the short URL to the original URL and issue a HTTP Redirect back to your browser to send you off to the original long url website. So, what’s a guy, or gal, to do if they want to set their status programmatically on Twitter, Facebook, FriendFeed, or the other gazillion social networking sites ... (more)

The List: iControl Languages, Libraries, and IDEs

Back in 2001 (wow – seems like yesterday!), F5 introduced the first-ever, open/Web services API for network devices called iControl. With it, it sparked a major shift in the way companies could look at integrating network devices with applications. Leading software vendors figured it out. And, thousands of companies since then have used iControl to build custom monitoring apps, management solutions that more closely fit their internal processes, and even automate some cool stuff including enabling applications to tell the network how to deliver them. While all fine and dandy (and fun to be a part of personally), the most important decision and event was the willingness to embrace SOAP/XML. By doing this (kudos to Joe Pruitt, BTW, for this call… it wasn’t without some feisty internal debate, truth be told), it opened up API access to our gear from virtually any SOAP... (more)

OpenNebula: Open Source Cloud Management

What Is OpenNebula ? It is cloud management solution – industry standard open source cloud computing tool to manage the complexity and heterogeneity of distributed data center infrastructures. OpenNebula is a fully open-source management toolkit for on-premise Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud computing. OpenNebula can be primarily used as a virtualization tool to manage your virtual infrastructure in the data-center or cluster, which is usually referred as Private Cloud. OpenNebula supports Hybrid Cloud to combine local infrastructure with public cloud-based infrastructure, enabling highly scalable hosting environments. OpenNebula also supports Public Clouds by providing Cloud interfaces to expose its functionality for virtual machine, storage and network management. OpenNebula can be primarily used as a virtualization tool to manage your virtual infrastruc... (more)

What You Read Says a Lot About You

It is interesting, talking with people about what they read, and seeing how what they read is reflected in their daily lives. Even the occasional reader of this blog would not be surprised to find that I spend some amount of time with my nose buried in epic fantasy books and military history books. It shows in much of how I carry myself, what I do for hobbies, and even the examples I choose in this blog. But a far greater percentage of my time has been spent reading about computer science. Since I was a young teen, those were avocations, I wanted computers to be my vocation. So it should surprise no one that I devoured what can arguably be called the classics of our field – Norton’s hardware programming books, compiler theory books (used one book in each of my post-secondary degrees, own dozens, literally. Compilers and OS Design fascinate me), some of the Cisco st... (more)

Look Beyond The Mobile or Web Client To The Internet of Things

Kin Lane, the API Evangelist, has produced a list of the Ten API Commandments for Providers. It's a very good list, including privacy, security, and documentation. I encourage everyone to read it and comment. What about the corresponding list for API Consumers? Although I don't want to compare myself to a biblical figure (or indeed to Kin Lane :) ), here is my crack at a list of API commandments for consumers: 1. Protect your API Keys. API Keys are often issued to developers through an API Portal to use in their apps. These API Key allow developers to access apps. Sometimes the keys are used in conjunction with OAuth, or sometimes they are used in a pure API Key based authentication scheme. It is natural for developers to use Github as a repository for their code. But, what if the API Key is baked into the code of your API consumer app? Ross Penham recently wrote abou... (more)

Solution Dependencies in SharePoint 2010

With MOSS 2007, I often got asked what order do I install these solution packages in.  Oftentimes, it was critical that they get installed in a particular order.  With features, we have had the ability to set dependencies, but we really didn’t have anything like that for solution packages.  Well, I haven’t heard people talking about this new feature yet, but we can in fact set solution dependencies in the manifest.xml file. The way it works is that it checks to see if a dependent solution has already been deployed on your farm (or site collection for sandbox solutions).  However, it won’t chain deploy child solutions for you like you can do with hidden dependent features.  It does this check when you attempt to deploy the feature (not when you add it).  It also won’t remove a parent solution should you remove any of its dependent child solutions.  Solution dependen... (more)

Layer 7 Brings Governance Into the Cloud

Layer 7 Technologies has announced the availability of the Layer 7 SecureSpan Virtual Appliance for cloud governance. The Virtual Appliance offers all the features of the SecureSpan family of hardware appliances, including sophisticated runtime governance, agent-less SOA management and industry-leading XML security in a VMware or ESX-based soft appliance. The Layer 7 Virtual Appliance for cloud governance allows organizations to secure cloud-based interactions, monitor service level conformance and adapt to changing conditions and needs. Traditionally, Layer 7 customers have deployed the SecureSpan Virtual Appliance as a budget-friendly alternative to hardware appliances. The SecureSpan Virtual Appliance for cloud governance incorporates the new Layer 7 Enterprise Service Manager (ESM), which is a lightweight method of centrally managing, tracking and measuring app... (more)

SOA Product Review: Intel XML Software Suite 1.1

The one thing that unifies the distributed computing style known as SOA, in most of its manifestations, is self-describing data via the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The benefits of XML over opaque message formats in data interchange are well established. No matter if your focus is SOAP, REST, POX, or syndication with RSS or ATOM, your applications will revolve around XML processing. The bane of XML has always been the overhead of processing it in terms of memory and CPU consumption - parsing documents, performing XML Schema validation, searching for elements with XPath, and especially executing transforms. This problem has been met head-on by Intel's Software and Services Group, with the release of the Intel® XML Software Suite. The fact that Intel has a software development group dedicated to creating software tools optimized for Intel hardware platforms is no... (more)

Intel to Debut New Version of XML Software Suite at SYS-CON's SOA World Conference & Expo, November 19-21, San Jose, CA

Intel will debut the latest release of its XML Software Suite 1.2 during the upcoming SOA World Conference & Expo, November 19-21, 2008, at the Fairmont Hotel, in San Jose, California. Intel has just released Intel XML Software Suite 1.2. This latest release helps maximize XML performance, while minimizing the effort for any Enterprise, SOA, SaaS, and Web 2.0 based applications. Intel XML Software Suite 1.2 optimizes XML application performance, takes full advantage of Intel Architecture, lowers total cost of ownership and allows developers to quickly and easily incorporate technologies for a faster time to market. This updated Intel XML Software Suite includes support for Intel Core i7 processors, StAX API for Java, and increased compatibility with IBM WebSphere and Oracle WebLogic. This new version is also engineered to automatically take advantage of the new Intel ... (more)

Does Cloud Computing Exacerbate Security and File Transfer Issues?

SOA Security at Cloud Expo Here is an interesting article by Rob Barry titled: "In SOA, cloud resources may exacerbate security and file transfers issues." It highlights significant requirements for Federated SOA especially around large file transfer using SOAP Attachments. The article makes the following interesting points: With increasing cloud adoption, there is an increase of large file transfers to external cloud providers such as Amazon S3 or Rackspace CloudFiles or to a company's internally hosted cloud.  The file size increase is driven by the a low-hanging use case for S3 and CloudFiles:  securely archiving rarely used corporate data in the cloud.  The result of such archiving of batch data is an ever-growing file transfer over HTTP as a MIME of MTOM attachments.  Consider the opposite scenario:  if the data is real-time the transaction rate is higher but t... (more)